Get Fit for Life

Forget the beach bod - get a life ..

Advertorials differ from traditional advertisements in that they are designed to look like the articles that appear in the publication. Most publications will not accept advertisements that look exactly like stories from the newspaper or magazine they are appearing in. The differences may be subtle, and disclaimers—such as the word "advertisement"—may or may not appear. Sometimes euphemisms describing the advertorial as a "special promotional feature" or "special advertising section" are used. The tone of the advertorials is usually closer to that of a press release than of an objective news story.

Advertorials can also be printed and presented as an entire newspaper section, inserted the same way within a newspaper as store fliers, comics sections, and other non-editorial content. These sections are usually printed on a smaller type of broadsheet and different newsprint than the actual paper. Many newspapers and magazines will assign staff writers or freelancers to write advertorials, usually without a byline credit. A major difference between regular editorial and advertorial is that clients usually have content approval of advertorials, a luxury usually not provided with regular editorial.

A related practice is the creation of material that looks like traditional media (for instance, a newspaper or magazine) but is actually created by a company to market its products. One familiar example is airline in-flight magazines, which may feature reports about travel destinations to which the airline flies.

Christine Kenny, nutritionist and qualified personal trainer, rejects many of the ideas promoted by the modern health and fitness industry which she believes has caused unprecedented levels of body dissatisfaction and left many of us with a confused idea of what a healthy body looks like!   She says, “A big part of my work is debunking myths around food and exercise, I hate quick fixes and before and after pictures!”

Christine emphasises that a ‘good’ diet doesn’t require expensive supplements or the exclusion of certain food groups and exercise should enhance our daily lives not dominate them.  Skinny doesn’t always equal healthy and a ‘good-looking’ body should be a by-product of a healthy lifestyle and not an end in itself

“If getting fit means hours in the gym every day, putting your social life on hold because you can’t eat certain foods or have a drink, if you become preoccupied with everything that goes into your mouth. Then that isn’t you being happy with yourself. Wellness encompasses the whole of you, healthy mind, healthy body go hand in hand”.  We like this philosophy!

A healthy diet shouldn't cost the earth 

Christine is particularly interested in women’s health and fitness and has recently launched a new women-only exercise class in Bowdon which addresses the health issues that affect women the most.

Many women notice that they gain weight as they approach the menopause. As we reach our forties and fifties muscle mass decreases meaning that our bodies don’t burn energy as efficiently and we can start to put on weight. Bone density can also be an issue for women as we age. After the age of 35 we begin to experience a slow loss of calcium from the bones and the bones lose density resulting in osteoporosis and the potential for painful fractures. Christine’s class focuses on resistance and weight bearing exercise which help to increase bone density and therefore reduces the risk of osteoporosis. Her years of experience as a nutritionist mean that Christine is also able to give advice on diet and she emphasises the importance of a diet providing adequate Vitamin D and calcium for bone health.

Christine in action

So why is it important to have an all-female class? Christine recognises that many women feel intimidated by gyms and mixed classes. They may feel that they will be judged if their body doesn’t fit the ‘bikini-ready’ image. The fitness industry is mainly directed at the young and we see very few images of mature women exercising unless they are extremely glamorous.

Christine says ‘This group is about providing a safe place for women to come and exercise together, there’s no pressure to look a certain way or be a particular size. There will be support and encouragement. We all know what happens when a group of women come together with a shared interest. We support each other. The class isn’t about being a size 10 and exercising like crazy just to look good on the beach this summer, it’s about improving health and wellbeing, feeling great about yourself now not putting off that feeling until you’ve achieved your goal! “

Christine’s class takes place on Tuesdays at 8:30am at St. Luke's Church, Vicarage Lane, Bowdon. Have a look at Christine’s website here to find out about her other classes and services.

 

Advertorials differ from traditional advertisements in that they are designed to look like the articles that appear in the publication. Most publications will not accept advertisements that look exactly like stories from the newspaper or magazine they are appearing in. The differences may be subtle, and disclaimers—such as the word "advertisement"—may or may not appear. Sometimes euphemisms describing the advertorial as a "special promotional feature" or "special advertising section" are used. The tone of the advertorials is usually closer to that of a press release than of an objective news story.

Advertorials can also be printed and presented as an entire newspaper section, inserted the same way within a newspaper as store fliers, comics sections, and other non-editorial content. These sections are usually printed on a smaller type of broadsheet and different newsprint than the actual paper. Many newspapers and magazines will assign staff writers or freelancers to write advertorials, usually without a byline credit. A major difference between regular editorial and advertorial is that clients usually have content approval of advertorials, a luxury usually not provided with regular editorial.

A related practice is the creation of material that looks like traditional media (for instance, a newspaper or magazine) but is actually created by a company to market its products. One familiar example is airline in-flight magazines, which may feature reports about travel destinations to which the airline flies.

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