Charlie's Chums Dog Walking and Pet Care Services

Trust Rachael to care for your furry family members

Advertorials differ from traditional advertisements in that they are designed to look like the articles that appear in the publication. Most publications will not accept advertisements that look exactly like stories from the newspaper or magazine they are appearing in. The differences may be subtle, and disclaimers—such as the word "advertisement"—may or may not appear. Sometimes euphemisms describing the advertorial as a "special promotional feature" or "special advertising section" are used. The tone of the advertorials is usually closer to that of a press release than of an objective news story.

Advertorials can also be printed and presented as an entire newspaper section, inserted the same way within a newspaper as store fliers, comics sections, and other non-editorial content. These sections are usually printed on a smaller type of broadsheet and different newsprint than the actual paper. Many newspapers and magazines will assign staff writers or freelancers to write advertorials, usually without a byline credit. A major difference between regular editorial and advertorial is that clients usually have content approval of advertorials, a luxury usually not provided with regular editorial.

A related practice is the creation of material that looks like traditional media (for instance, a newspaper or magazine) but is actually created by a company to market its products. One familiar example is airline in-flight magazines, which may feature reports about travel destinations to which the airline flies.

Those of us with beloved pets know how much anguish we feel when we need to leave them home alone. Anguish because we know it’s bad for them, they will hate it and they need to be let out for a wee etc. In my case, it’s also because after a couple of hours alone my determined border terrier would have burrowed through the foundations and be disappearing over the horizon.  But who can we trust with our darlings? Rachael of Charlie’s Chums, of course!

Home alone pets can get sad!

To start with she’s got all the insurances and registrations in order and is DBS checked. More important than all that though,  she loves animals and is passionate about her job. Rachael grew up around dogs as her parents bred Bull Mastiffs. Her mum was a ‘Florence Nightingale’ for local animal waifs and strays and the family home was like a menagerie, full of birds, cats and fish.

Rachael’s own dog, Charlie, is a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (see the top of the article). Charlie is the face of the business: Rachael is the sidekick who does all the hard work. Rachael set up Charlie’s Chums after deciding not to return to her career in corporate recruitment after her son was born. She wanted to spend some time at home and looked for a role that she could fit around her baby.Having done some research and looked around at the services required by residents in Hale, Bowdon and Altrincham, Rachael saw that a pet care service was an obvious fit.

Rachael offers three services; dog walking, doggy day care and house visits.

Rachael’s job is an enviable one on a lovely Spring day, with her favourite routes including Lymm Dam, Dunham Park and the Devisdale in Bowdon. Owners can keep in touch with their dogs via the ‘Doggy Logs’ app which allows them to track walks via GPS. Photos and videos of the dogs can be uploaded via the app as can email notes of any specific issues that owners need to be aware of. Rachael also offers 1-2-1 walks.

Dog walking is an enviable job on a lovely day

The doggie day care takes place in Rachael’s home in Altrincham. She only takes two dogs a day and they receive at least a couple of walks, spending the rest of the time relaxing. House visits last for 15/20 minutes - long enough for a bit of a play, a quick trip outside and a check on food and water if necessary. Again, Rachael can send owners a quick update.

Rachael disproves the notion that we are all either dog or cat people as she also loves cats and is available for cat care. In fact, she is keen to widen Charlie’s circle of chums by taking on a wider variety of pets. Every species of pet is welcome – well, almost every species. Rachael is not very keen on spiders so no tarantulas, thank you!

Visit Rachael’s Facebook page here for more details. 

Advertorials differ from traditional advertisements in that they are designed to look like the articles that appear in the publication. Most publications will not accept advertisements that look exactly like stories from the newspaper or magazine they are appearing in. The differences may be subtle, and disclaimers—such as the word "advertisement"—may or may not appear. Sometimes euphemisms describing the advertorial as a "special promotional feature" or "special advertising section" are used. The tone of the advertorials is usually closer to that of a press release than of an objective news story.

Advertorials can also be printed and presented as an entire newspaper section, inserted the same way within a newspaper as store fliers, comics sections, and other non-editorial content. These sections are usually printed on a smaller type of broadsheet and different newsprint than the actual paper. Many newspapers and magazines will assign staff writers or freelancers to write advertorials, usually without a byline credit. A major difference between regular editorial and advertorial is that clients usually have content approval of advertorials, a luxury usually not provided with regular editorial.

A related practice is the creation of material that looks like traditional media (for instance, a newspaper or magazine) but is actually created by a company to market its products. One familiar example is airline in-flight magazines, which may feature reports about travel destinations to which the airline flies.

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